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dc.rights.licenseAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
dc.creatorO'Bryant, Sid E.
dc.creatorEdwards, Melissa
dc.creatorZhang, Fan
dc.creatorJohnson, Leigh A.
dc.creatorHall, James R.
dc.creatorKuras, Yuliya
dc.creatorScherzer, Clemens R.
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-07T13:54:26Z
dc.date.available2022-07-07T13:54:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-02
dc.identifier.citationO'Bryant, S. E., Edwards, M., Zhang, F., Johnson, L. A., Hall, J., Kuras, Y., & Scherzer, C. R. (2019). Potential two-step proteomic signature for Parkinson's disease: Pilot analysis in the Harvard Biomarkers Study. Alzheimer's & dementia (Amsterdam, Netherlands),11, 374-382. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dadm.2019.03.001
dc.identifier.issn2352-8729
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12503/31536
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: We sought to determine if our previously validated proteomic profile for detecting Alzheimer's disease would detect Parkinson's disease (PD) and distinguish PD from other neurodegenerative diseases. Methods: Plasma samples were assayed from 150 patients of the Harvard Biomarkers Study (PD, n = 50; other neurodegenerative diseases, n = 50; healthy controls, n = 50) using electrochemiluminescence and Simoa platforms. Results: The first step proteomic profile distinguished neurodegenerative diseases from controls with a diagnostic accuracy of 0.94. The second step profile distinguished PD cases from other neurodegenerative diseases with a diagnostic accuracy of 0.98. The proteomic profile differed in step 1 versus step 2, suggesting that a multistep proteomic profile algorithm to detecting and distinguishing between neurodegenerative diseases may be optimal. Discussion: These data provide evidence of the potential use of a multitiered blood-based proteomic screening method for detecting individuals with neurodegenerative disease and then distinguishing PD from other neurodegenerative diseases.
dc.description.sponsorshipC.R.S. was supported in part by the American Parkinson Disease Association and NIH grants U01NS082157, U01NS095736, U01NS100603, and R01AG057331. HBS was supported by the APDA Advanced Center for Parkinson's Disease Research, Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center, NINDS U01NS082157, U01NS100603, and the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center NIA P50AG005134. S.E.O. was supported in part by grants from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health under award numbers R01AG054073, R01AG051848, R01AG058252, and R01AG058537.
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.dadm.2019.03.001
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceAlzheimer's & Dementia Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring
dc.subjectblood biomarkers
dc.subjectdiagnostic accuracy
dc.subjectParkinson's disease
dc.subject.meshParkinson Disease
dc.subject.meshPrecision Medicine
dc.subject.meshProteomics
dc.titlePotential two-step proteomic signature for Parkinson's disease: Pilot analysis in the Harvard Biomarkers Study
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2019 The Authors
dc.type.materialtext
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-0582-5266 (O'Bryant, Sid E.)
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-7769-8417 (Johnson, Leigh A.)
dc.identifier.volume11


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)