The History of Osteopathy Collection

Date

2007

Authors

The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth

ORCID

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Gibson D. Lewis Library

Abstract

The History of Osteopathy Collection contains papers, manuscripts, prints, and memorabilia collected by the faculty and staff of the University of North Texas Health Science Center. The collection includes materials from several state, national and international osteopathic associations, the A.T. Still Museum and various colleges of Osteopathic Medicine.

Description

Finding aid for The History of Osteopathy Collection
Osteopathic Medicine was founded by Andrew Taylor Still, M.D. in 1874. Controversial at first, this system opposed most of the established medical practices of the 1800s and early 1900s, which included treatments such as bloodletting and the use of purgatives, mercury, and alcohol-based compounds by physicians who were poorly or incompletely trained. The son of a Methodist minister, Still attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Kansas City, Kansas. He also served as a state legislator and enlisted in the Ninth Kansas Cavalry during the Civil War. After the war, Still provided health care to settlers and Native Americans. He became increasingly dissatisfied with the established medical practices of the day while he was treating the epidemics of the time period, including cholera, pneumonia, smallpox, meningitis, diphtheria, and tuberculosis. Still avoided the liberal use of drugs in his search for alternative therapies, believing that his role as a physician was to facilitate the body's inherent ability to heal itself. He developed osteopathic manipulative treatment and a philosophy of medicine that was based on his experiences. His intent was not to create a separate profession; rather, his goal was to improve the system of medicine. Although his ideas were initially rejected by the medical community, D.O.s received full practice rights in all 50 states by 1973. Presently, there are over 60,000 D.O.s in the United States, with more joining the profession each year. (From the UNTHSC OMM website https://www.unthsc.edu/texas-college-of-osteopathic-medicine/family-medicine-osteopathic-manipulative-medicine/frequently-asked-questions/ )

Citation

The History of Osteopathic Medicine Collection, [box number(s)]. The University of North Texas Health Science Center, Gibson D. Lewis Library, Archives. [NOTE: The collection includes several yearbooks from the various osteopathic colleges that will need to be cited individually. Ask librarian for assistance when citing yearbooks.]

Rights

License