The Association of Mobile Health Applications with Self-Management Behaviors among Adults with Chronic Conditions in the United States

Date

2021-09-30

Authors

Wang, Hao
Ho, Amy F.
Wiener, R. Constance
Sambamoorthi, Usha

ORCID

0000-0001-8311-1360 (Sambamoorthi, Usha)

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

MDPI

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Mobile applications related to health and wellness (mHealth apps) are widely used to self-manage chronic conditions. However, research on whether mHealth apps facilitate self-management behaviors of individuals with chronic conditions is sparse. We aimed to evaluate the association of mHealth apps with different types of self-management behaviors among patients with chronic diseases in the United States. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional observational study. We used data from adult participants (unweighted n = 2340) of the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2018 and 2019. We identified three self-management behaviors: (1) resource utilization using electronic personal health records; (2) treatment discussions with healthcare providers; and (3) making healthcare decisions. We analyzed the association of mHealth apps to self-management behaviors with multivariable logistic and ordinal regressions. RESULTS: Overall, 59.8% of adults (unweighted number = 1327) used mHealth apps. Adults using mHealth apps were more likely to use personal health records (AOR = 3.11, 95% CI 2.26-4.28), contact healthcare providers using technology (AOR = 2.70, 95% CI 1.93-3.78), and make decisions on chronic disease management (AOR = 2.59, 95% CI 1.93-3.49). The mHealth apps were associated with higher levels of self-management involvement (AOR = 3.53, 95% CI 2.63-4.72). CONCLUSION: Among individuals with chronic conditions, having mHealth apps was associated with positive self-management behaviors.

Description

Citation

Wang, H., Ho, A. F., Wiener, R. C., & Sambamoorthi, U. (2021). The Association of Mobile Health Applications with Self-Management Behaviors among Adults with Chronic Conditions in the United States. International journal of environmental research and public health, 18(19), 10351. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910351

Rights

© 2021 by the authors.

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)