Relationship between Sleep Duration and Hypertension in US Adults using Age- and BMI-Stratified Models

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2019-03-05

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Okunowo, Oluwatimilehin
Orimoloye, Helen
Njesada, Ndolembai
Solomon, Ambe
Bakre, Sulaimon

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Relationship between Sleep Duration and Hypertension in US Adults using Age- and BMI-Stratified Models ABSTRACT Background: Hypertension is a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Previous research has confirmed the relationship between sleep duration and hypertension. However, there are unanswered questions on how this relationship is affected by age and body mass index (BMI). Purpose: To examine the association between sleep duration and hypertension in US adults and investigate interaction by age and BMI. Methods: Data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) between 2014 and 2017 was analyzed for adults aged 18 years or older (n=130,139). Sleep duration was categorized as short (hours) or long ([greater than] 9 hours). Multivariable logistic regression estimated the likelihood of hypertension associated with short or long sleep duration relative to the National Sleep Foundation’s recommended 7-9 hours. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, short sleep was associated with higher odds of hypertension (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.35-2.02). Although not statistically significant, long sleep was also associated with higher odds of hypertension (OR: 1.19, 95% CI: 0.71-1.67). A significant sleep x age and sleep x BMI interaction was noted (p Conclusions: Short sleep duration is a significant risk factor for hypertension in the United States. This relationship is mediated by age and BMI and is especially notable in middle-aged and underweight adults.

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