POPULATION-BASED RATES AND CORRELATES OF SELF-REPORTED FREQUENT MENTAL DISTRESS IN DIFFERENT SOCIO-GEOGRAPHIC ENVIRONMENTS IN TEXAS

Date

2013-04-12

Authors

Akinboro, Oladimeji

ORCID

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

Purpose: Background: Frequent mental distress (FMD) is an indicator of poor mental health used in health-related quality of life surveillance. FMD is defined as reporting at least 14 days of mental ill-health in the prior 30-day period. Objectives: 1. To examine FMD rates in different sociogeographical populations in Texas 2. To evaluate the population-based correlates of FMD 3. To assess the use of medication for mental health problems among individuals with FMD Methods: At least 385 adults each from six counties in Texas (N=2,330), selected using probability-based dual-frame random digit dialing, were surveyed via computer-assisted telephone interviews between September and November 2012. The sampled counties were Hale (rural northwest); Lubbock (urban northwest); McLennan (urban central); Jim Wells (rural south); Willacy (rural south); and Webb (urban south). A forward stepwise procedure (entry criterion: p Results: FMD prevalence ranged from 4.5% (95% CI: 2.35, 6.57) in Lubbock county to 11.1% (95% CI: 5.36, 16.90) in McLennan. Lower odds of FMD were seen in Hispanics (vs.) non-Hispanic whites (OR=0.31, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.62); the elderly (e65 years) vs. 18-44 year-olds (OR=0.34, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.77); and males vs. females (OR=0.50, 95% CI: 0.27, 0.93). Higher odds of FMD were seen with inability to work vs. employed (OR=8.38; 95% CI=4.03, 17.43); and rarely/never having social support vs. most times/always (OR=4.59, 95% CI: 2.22, 9.51). 41.2% (95% CI: 27.40%, 55.00%) of those with FMD were on medication for mental health or emotional problems. Conclusions: FMD rates may vary across sociogeographic environments in Texas. Strengthening the social support systems for those with FMD holds promise for addressing the burden of poor mental health if the nature of association between social support and FMD can be clearly elucidated. A low medication usage rate among those with FMD suggests a need for increased clinical surveillance, and treatment for mental and emotional problems.

Description

Citation

Rights

License