The Richard N. MacBain, D.O. Collection

Date
1974
Authors
MacBain, Richard N.
ORCID
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Gibson D. Lewis Library
Abstract

The Richard N. MacBain, D.O. Collection contains certificates, awards and personal items that Dr. MacBain acquired during his lifetime. It also includes a scrapbook from the Reception and Dinner Honoring Dr. Norman MacBain by the Chicago College of Osteopathy, May 21, 1967.

Description
Finding aid for The Richard N. MacBain, D.O. Collection
Richard Norman MacBain was born January 29, 1897 in Mild May, Ontario, Canada, the son of an Anglican/Methodist minister. The family with five children moved every two years, and he lived in many small towns in southern Ontario. He served in the Canadian Army during WWI and shortly after came to study at the Chicago College of Osteopathy, graduating I believe in 1924. Not too long after, he became dean and later president of the college and held that office until retirement. Somewhere along the line, when Dr. Floyd Peckham retired, he also became administrator of the Chicago Osteopathic Hospital. He always said no one should run a hospital unless they knew how to start the boiler -- and he did. In 1936 he married the widowed Alice Peterman Peckham and thereafter raised her son, John Russell Peckham, now a retired D.O. (The Peckhams were influential in osteopathic medicine and politics.) Dr. and Mrs. MacBain had one daughter, Judith Ann, born in 1938. During many of his administrative years, Dr. MacBain maintained a private manipulative practice in downtown Chicago. He treated many celebrities and made house calls for regular patients. He was also active in national osteopathic affairs. One of his major accomplishments, working with Dr. Floyd Peckham, was to push through a state law giving full medical license privileges to osteopathic physicians. The bill passed in 1955. Dr. MacBain realized that they would never get full rights without a strong background in the basic sciences, and building the basic sciences program at the college was an early and important goal. He retired in 1969, and the MacBains moved to Tryon, NC. In the early 1970s a new wing of the Chicago Osteopathic Hospital was dedicated to him. He died November 1, 1979 in Houston TX.
Citation
Richard N. MacBain, D.O. Collection, OS 00006, SHL 0005-0006, The University of North Texas Health Science Center, Gibson D. Lewis Library, Archives.