Does fruit and vegetable intake differ by diabetes status in middle-aged females?

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2020

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Hartos, Jessica
Julius, Jennifer
Rosa, Paige
Fernandez, Courtney
Grafa, Amy

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Abstract

Purpose:Healthy eating may impact development of diabetes, but research has not addressed whether healthy eating differs by those with and without diabetes in specific demographic groups. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fruit and vegetable intake differs by diabetes status in middle-aged females. Methods:This cross-sectional analysis used 2017 BRFSS data for females ages 45-64 years old in Arizona (n=2,609), Florida (n=3,768), Georgia (n=1,018), and Texas (n=2,092). Multiple logistic regression analysis by state assessed the relationship between daily fruit intake and diabetes status, and daily vegetable intake and diabetes status, while controlling for health status, health behaviors, demographic factors, and socioeconomic status. Results:The majority of middle-aged females reported daily fruit intake (60-67%) and most reported daily vegetable intake (81-86%). About one-fifth of participants reported ever being diagnosed with diabetes (15-19%). Adjusted analysis indicated that daily fruit and vegetable intake did not differ by diabetes status. Conclusions:Across states, daily fruit and vegetable intake did not differ by diabetes status in middle-aged females. However, active and highly active participants were more likely to report daily fruit and vegetable intake. Those reporting insufficiently active were more likely to report daily fruit intake, and those reporting current tobacco use were less likely to report daily fruit intake. In the primary care setting it is important for providers to screen and educate females ages 45-64 on the importance of diabetes management, daily fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, and implications of tobacco use.

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