A Reliable Nonhuman Primate Model of Ischemic Stroke with Reproducible Infarct Size and Long-term Sensorimotor Deficits

Date

2023-02-24

Authors

Lin, Xiao
Wang, Hua
Huang, Shengwei
Chen, Lefu
Yang, Su
Zhao, Peiqi
Lin, Zhongxiao
Yang, Jianjing
Ruan, Linhui
Ni, Haoqi

ORCID

0000-0002-1336-348X (Jin, Kunlin)

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Aging and Disease

Abstract

A nonhuman primate model of ischemic stroke is considered as an ideal preclinical model to replicate various aspects of human stroke because of their similarity to humans in genetics, neuroanatomy, physiology, and immunology. However, it remains challenging to produce a reliable and reproducible stroke model in nonhuman primates due to high mortality and variable outcomes. Here, we developed a focal cerebral ischemic model induced by topical application of 50% ferric chloride (FeCl(3)) onto the MCA-M1 segment through a cranial window in the cynomolgus monkeys. We found that FeCl(3) rapidly produced a stable intraarterial thrombus that caused complete occlusion of the MCA, leading to the quick decrease of the regional cerebral blood flow in 10 min. A typical cortical infarct was detected 24 hours by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was stable at least for 1 month after surgery. The sensorimotor deficit assessed by nonhuman primate stroke scale was observed at 1 day and up to 3 months after ischemic stroke. No spontaneous revascularization or autolysis of thrombus was observed, and vital signs were not affected. All operated cynomolgus monkeys survived. Our data suggested that FeCl(3)-induced stroke in nonhuman primates was a replicable and reliable model that is necessary for the correct prediction of the relevance of experimental therapeutic approaches in human beings.

Description

Citation

Lin, X., Wang, H., Huang, S., Chen, L., Yang, S., Zhao, P., Lin, Z., Yang, J., Ruan, L., Ni, H., Wang, K., Wen, M., Jin, K., & Zhuge, Q. (2023). A Reliable Nonhuman Primate Model of Ischemic Stroke with Reproducible Infarct Size and Long-term Sensorimotor Deficits. Aging and disease, 14(1), 245-255. https://doi.org/10.14336/AD.2022.0722

Rights

© 2022 Lin X. et al.

License

Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)